10 best national pavilions in the Venice Biennial 2022

10 Melhores Pavilhões Nacionais na Bienal de Veneza 2022

There are dozens of pavilions in the Venice Biennial - some housed inside Arsenale and Giardini, the two main spaces, and many not. It is virtually impossible to see all of them, no matter how much you feel. This represents a challenge: how to choose the most important? To help, we set up a list of the top 10 biennial pavilions this year.

10.Australia
Marco Fusinato almost breaks the walls of the Australian pavilion with its sound installation Disasters , in which the artist performs live playing an electric guitar in deafening volume. (Ear tampons are not supplied.) While fusinate plays his music, a technological loop complex transmits images generated after inserting unveiled terms in search engines. These images, which appear on huge LED screens, travel almost the full length of the pavilion and constitute what fusinate has called a punctuation.

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9.Romania
When he won the main award of the Berlin Film Festival in 2018, Touch Me Not, from PINTILIE ADINA, he polarized critics with their clinical portraits of unlabeled forms of sex, rarely represented on the screen. For the Romania Pavilion, Pintilie returned to this feature reconfiguring some images of Touch Me Not, In two new video facilities, as part of a ongoing research project. By paying so much attention to disabled and largely non -heterosexual individuals, Pintilie intends to promote a broader definition of intimacy and greater empathy between her interviewees and the viewer, a device emphasized by causing the subjects to look back at themselves. While most visitors only attend the Giardini Pavilion, the best part of this exhibition is located throughout the city, in the new Gallery of the Romanian Institute of Culture and Humanistic Research. The must -see work is a virtual reality piece in which the viewer can look, touch and even see through the eyes of the subjects of Pintilie.

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8.Brazil
The Brazilian Pavilion stood out in the crowd for dry humor. In this pavilion, the viewer enters a gigantic sculpture of an ear. Every part there are other “weirdness”: a sculpture of a severed language leaking blood, a suspended head that swings up and down (and threatens to reach viewers who are not careful) and more. Fun and games end when you find a video with rhythmicly cut zooms in people's hands and feet, which are interspersed with revolt scenes in Brazil. In the hands of Jonathas de Andrade, his home country, Brazil, is a sick body who needs healing.

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7. Portugal
Vampires that inhabit a spacecraft to the drift are the theme of Pedro Neves Marques. In the unusual pavilion of Portugal, there is a show that acts as a smart piece with horror traps and science fiction and a tender meditation on body transformation. Although there are several elegant poems printed on long sheets of paper, three films are the main attraction here, each focusing on five people traveling among the stars to reach some unknown destination. In a movie, one of the passengers mysteriously removes a retainer equipped with a set of prey and places it on a table; In another, the protagonists read X-Men drawn bands (Mutant Superheroes). Although there is nothing openly strange in these films, vampires have been used as metaphors for people who pass in a world where almost everything works differently. Neves Marques' creatures work similarly - they look like us, but they were marginalized to a point where they no longer live on the same planet. After all, they find ways of survival.

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6. Latvian
The big surprise of the Biennial was the Latonia Pavilion, a beautiful collection of ceramics for the duo Skuja Braden. None of the sculptures here are from the dramatic scale normally seen in the Biennial Pavilions, but all impress because of their strangeness. Some seem to be deformed dishes that hang on the table side, and others may function as vessels; One is really a functional source, and another takes the shape of a tile wall. Fish, snails, snakes, dalmatians and plump women appear everywhere, as well as Buddha images, a reference to the Zen faith of the artists.

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5.Mexico
Rarely, or never, collective exhibitions in pavilions are a good idea, but Mexico tried the format for their entrance this time, a stimulating exposure of four people who evoke the country's indigenous cultures through concept art. The best work of this pavilion is the Tetzahuitl (2019–22), from Fernando Palma Rodríguez, a group of 43 dresses that are organized to move in a standard similar to what a Nahuatl shaman can do through machines. The movement of dresses, each represents a student who disappeared in 2014, in a mass kidnapping that caused national protests, is unpredictable and somewhat scary. Meanwhile, Mariana Castillo Deball designed a wooden floor recorded with patterns that resemble colonialist mapping. Naomi Rincón Gallardo has a video with performers disguised as well -known Oaxacas deities. Finally, Santiago Borja has 23 fabrics made in collaboration with Tsotsil weavers, which translated a sequence of human DNA into hanging abstractions.

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4.England
This exuberant pavilion of Sonia Boyce It presents a variety of photographs, sound and video, and focuses on the little recognized contributions of British black musicians to the culture of your country. In the central work of this pavilion, a videoinstallation called Feeling Her Way(2022), five singers - Errollyn Wallen, Jacqui Dankworth, Poppy Ajudha, Sofia Jernberg and Tanita Tikaram - meet for the first time at the famous Abbey Road Studios to record together for the first time. The group covers generations and musical genres, and varied sounds that ironically produce unusual harmony. In other galleries, Boyce, who is the first black woman to represent England at the Venice Biennial, presents videos of each singer separately, along with memories related to British black musicians she has collected. Visually impressive and concise, this pavilion suggests a form of unity in a community that has long become invisible in British mainstream.

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3. U.S
Perhaps one of the most anticipated biennial pavilions, Simone LeighShow, was the first African descent woman to whom an American pavilion was conceived. The elegant and calm sculptures of this pavilion unfold intertwined stories of racism and antinegro misogyny, taking as a reference photographs that promoted pernicious stereotypes and colonialist exhibitions that cemented harmful attitudes among white Europeans. As usual, Leigh's focus is specifically black women, whose bodies increases with jug -like forms. It's too much to absorb, but Leigh does his magic, and the pavilion never seems excessively academic.

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2.Sami
Normally, this structure is labeled as a Nordic pavilion; This year, however, was renamed in honor of Sámi, the only native indigenous people in Europe. The art on display of Pauliina Feodoroff, Marat Ánne Sara and Anders Sunna corresponded to the ambitions of the pavilion. There are available works that allude to the carnage caused by Nordic colonialism against Sámi, but any kind of exposed violence is counterbalanced by a deeply rooted belief in resistance power. Sculpture of two parts of Sara Du-šan-ahttanu-šanIt is composed of reindeer tendons, key animals in Sámi culture, which are added to various aromas; One must smell fear, the other hope. Not far from it is the positively epic painting of Sunna, ILELEGAL SPIRITS OF SÁPMI (2022), which draws 50 years of activism since the approval of a law in Sweden that protects the rights of indigenous peoples. The installation literally contains history - there are shelves that house file materials that document law proceedings brought by Sámi.

Venice Biennial | P55.art

1.France
Zineb Sedira It stole the scene early on with its movement focused on the movement to achieve Algeria's independence, as it manifested in films from the 1960s. The subject is an intoxicating material, although I sedira has addressed it in a widely accessible way. This pavilion presents scenarios inspired by films like The Strange (1967), by Luchino Visconti, and F for Fake , by Orson Welles. (1973), along with a sedira -related film and research -related art he compiled by doing this exhibition. At the same time dense in information and lucidly lucid to the biennial pavilions, its exposure explores a legacy of anticolonial activism that has historically been a bitter pill for the French to swallow, and did it in a hopeful and moving way.

Venice Biennial | P55.art


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